According to The Union of Spiritual Communities of Christ, nearly 6,000 Doukhobors emigrated to Canada from Russia in 1908, settling in communal villages throughout the Kootenay-Boundary region of British Columbia, and specifically places like Grand Forks.
 Tasha Kanigan says most summer days are spent with her sons, Alex, 4, (left) and Lucas, 2, playing in the garden outside their home in Winlaw, British Columbia. She says she hopes to instil them with the same values she learned through Dukhoborism.
 Shane Whittleton, 26, who grew up as a Doukhobor, moved back to the area after studying and working in Alberta. He maintains a large garden not only because it's what he grew up with, but because "when the Doukhobors came here, they had nothing and the only way for them to survive was to grow their own food." Within his garden sits a building that was traditionally used as a bathhouse. Whittleton hopes to eventually restore it.
 A younger photo of John J. Verigin (right), the USCC's executive director, sits in the home where his grandmother used to live, in Castlegar, British Columbia.
 John J. Verigin has been serving at the USCC's executive director since 2008. He resents being called a leader, saying "we only have one leader, and that's J.C.."
 As Doukhobors enter the the Union of Spiritual Communities of Christ community centre in Grand Fork, British Columbia, for a payer meeting, they greet each other with a bow.
 Women wearing the traditional plotochik, or shawl, assemble for a payer meeting at the Union of Spiritual Communities of Christ community centre in Grand Forks, British Columbia, on Declaration Day.
 Mary Verigin (left) and Katie Koochin kiss each other during a prayer meeting on Declaration Day at the Union of Spiritual Communities of Christ community centre in Grand Forks, British Columbia. The kiss is symbolic of demonstrating sisterly love.
 Dharia Sookaveiff (left), 15, was one of the only youth in attendance at the prayer meeting on Declaration Day at the Union of Spiritual Communities of Christ community centre in Grand Forks, British Columbia.
 (From left to right) Laura Savinkoff, John J. Verigin, Laura Verigin and Nina Decaire walk back after having their photos taken at the newly unveiled "Stop of Interest Sign - The Doukhobours," just outside of Grand Forks along Highway 3.
 Sisters, Tony Fominoff (left) and Netta Zeberoff, sing during a gathering to commemorate Hiroshima Day outside the MIR Centre for Peace in Castlegar, British Columbia.
 Tasha and John Kanigan push their sons, Lucas, 2, (left) and Alex, 4, on the swing set outside their home in Winlaw, British Columbia.
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